• by
    Jé Maverick
    Saturday, December 11, 2010
    Bill Strickland

    I think that the one of the most important virtues in life is to value what it is that you undertake for a living. In this talk, Bill Strickland’s vision for education comes across as not only refreshing, but decidely humane. The practical application of dignity to programs that attempt to alter the lives of the impoverished, along with a dedication to use only top grade materials and personnel while doing so is almost unheard of in the social sector. To not only do this, but to emphasise that the experience itself must be beautiful (works of art everywhere one looks, fresh flowers, fountains) is radical.

    The take home message here is that the mindset can be applied to any type of field: mode of delivery is choice – so is economy.

  • by
    Jé Maverick
    Friday, December 10, 2010
    Charter For Compassion

    Now this, this is inspiring. I think Karen Armstrong’s work is awesome. If you haven’t checked out the charter yet, do so here.

  • by
    Jé Maverick
    Thursday, December 9, 2010
    Evelynn Glennie

    I love TED talks, and this is in my all time favorite top ten. The wonderful thing about Evelynn Glennie is her passion for percussion, in spite of her deafness. Throughout her talk, Evelynn uses both her deafness and music as metaphors for teaching us new ways of listening, not just to music, but to the world, and to each other.

  • by
    Jé Maverick
    Tuesday, December 7, 2010

    …and perhaps you will discover that these things whigh lightened your days were not as bright as first imagined, but that the illusion had more conviction than the illumination, and in the dying light and disorientation the darkness passed each of your senses through the aperture of the new: the flesh; the structures; the worn artefacts of the world became a braille for your lovely hands.

  • by
    Jé Maverick
    Tuesday, December 7, 2010

    Amid everything, there is wildness and oversight: brambles and creepers that take root without obedience; sprouts that gather in unseemly places; chimera that graft incompatibly; saplings that fail to thrive in shallow soil.

    Yet, there will be blossoms on the misfits; rebellion in beds meticulously ordered; withering stems which defy devotion and will not be coerced from a brink of death; hideous mutations which one will love equally with the comely.

    And toil – you will train vines and sculpt branches; dwell, arms up to the elbows in the sanctifying earth, tilling; pruning, shears at the ready – for you will arrive at knowing that you are the blooming and the dying; you are all that grows and decays between tuber and canopy, and it is with this that you must rise and fall: tending to weeds; to seasons; and to life, hoping, that of all tools and artefacts used for cultivation, the heart is the most worn.